The J/30

http://www.jboats.com/j30/images/j30galleynew.jpg

Anyone who knows the Victoria Sailing School knows how much we like the J Boats.  Well , we have a new one a J/30.

We are going to be using it for the Bareboat Chartering (ASA 104) course, as well as the Docking Endorsement (ASA 118).

Below is an article from Practical Sailor, describing the boat.

In a reviewing, Practical Sailor summarized the boat this way: "The J/30 Is slab-sided, with little sheer, short overhangs, and little grace. Fortunately, it goes like hell under sail.... She is a boat that inspires confidence. She is a young sailor’s boat, a stepping stone to the big time." Practical Sailor also quoted a 1981 price tag of $35,000 for the 30-footer, which should make current owners feel good; a reasonably maintained used one still goes in the low thirties these days. Sailing the J/30 can be as simple or complicated as you choose. Although a crew of seven is optimal for competitive racing, one experienced and one inexperienced person can handle it easily with the stock rig. Leave the jib down and it sails like a dinghy singlehanded.

On the other end of the spectrum, a killer storm during the 1979 Fastnet confirmed the J/30’s strength. A total of 24 yachts were abandoned and 15 sailors died, but Juggernaut, skippered by Andy Cassel and crewed by Tim Levett, made it unscathed across the Atlantic, despite having to run under bare poles for 14 hours and taking two severe knockdowns. Bill Wallace of Houston, Texas, survived the same storm while delivering J/30 hull #29 to Britain singlehanded. Upon arrival, he was asked by a Yachting World reporter how he and his crew held up under the storm. He sailed alone, he explained. "In what?" asked the reporter. "In that J/30 over there."

Wallace told Bob Johnstone afterward, "The J/30 is the best ********* sailboat in the world for its intended purpose. Only once did I get rolled down by a huge wave. And I’ve got coffee stains on the cabin overhead to show that it was 120 degrees."